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    Our Egalitarian Past

    Edward O'Donnell profiles the gifted thinker who led the struggle against concentrated wealth in the Gilded Age.
  • tm-slider-wilkinson-pickett

    Two Egalitarian Spirits

    British epidemiologists Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett have changed how we think about inequality.
  • success-shutterstock-182278607

    The Corruption of Success

    Where wealth concentrates, Elizabeth Anderson reminds us, the wealthy will see most of the rest of us as failures.
  • gated-community

    Segregation’s New Look

    In our ever more unequal world, Stanford's Sean Reardon details, our rich live ever more apart from the rest of us.

Most Popular Articles

Tracking Inequality

Can the Greedy Be Truly Generous?

Our hedge funds are celebrating another year of super earnings — with more crumbs for the victims of the political choices that have made hedgies so rich.

May 12, 2016

How Inequality Hurts

An Inequality Double-Whammy

From new research on the Great Recession, still more evidence that maldistributions of income and wealth really matter

June 24, 2016

Executive Pay

Shareholders as Super Heroes?

Let’s stop waiting for corporate insiders to fix our growing executive pay mess. Say on pay isn’t fixing anything.

June 8, 2016

Defective Enterprises

Policymakers, Listen to Your Hired Help

Our global economy will never become more productive, the developed world’s official research agency suggests, if we continue to let wealth concentrate.

June 2, 2016

Taxing Progressively

The Koch Brothers Cue the Music

A slick new ad campaign from America’s most notorious billionaires is tugging at our heartstrings — and distorting the debate over inequality.

June 24, 2016

Alternate Approaches

A Rougher Road for Redistribution

Progress in the struggle against inequality seems to have stalled in the deeply divided societies of Latin America. What next? Tulane economist Nora Lustig has an insightful perspective.

April 1, 2016

Quote of the Week

“Over the past decade, elites broke the world, and were unrepentant about their failure. They created the conditions for the worst economic crisis in nearly a century, and made sure that their elite friends at the top would scoop up the post-crisis gains, stranding the vast majority of people. They decided their project of globalization and liberalization mattered more than democracy. Brexit is among the first tangible responses.”
David Dayen, Who’s to Blame for Brexit? The Elites, American Prospect, June 24, 2016

Stat of the Week

The dark age of plutocratic money in campaign spending: Since January 2010, U.S. politicos have grabbed over $500 million from rich donors who do not have to reveal their identities, reports the Center for Responsive Politics, with many millions more expected in 2016.

Good Reads

New

The Rich Don’t Always Win. Really.

The Rich Don't Always WinToo Much editor Sam Pizzigati’s history of the forgotten triumph over America’s original plutocracy that created the American middle class.

Notable

How Our Inequality Limits Our Lives

This American Library Association “outstanding title” of the year explores the price we pay for massive inequality. Now available for reading online.

Classic

Understanding Our Acquisitive Society

Acquisitive SocietyBack in the 1930s, a University of Chicago project set out to list western civilization’s greatest books. Only one book by a living author, this one, made the cut.

Our Too Much commentaries now also appear regularly in the Inequality.org weekly newsletter. Ingequality.org Both Too Much and Inequality.org come to you from the Institute for Policy Studies.

Inequality and the Cash Register

Flacks for grand fortune would have us believe the rich are performing a public service every time they shop. Researchers tell a different story. Consumption by the rich ups the prices the non-rich pay.

Read the complete Too Much interview